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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 7, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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have striven these many months. the eyes of the world are upon you. the hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. in company with our brave allies and brothers in arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the german war machine. the elimination of nazi tyranny over the oppressed people of europe, and security for ourselves in a free world. your task will not be an easy one. your enemy is well trained, well-equipped and battle hardened. he will fight savagely. but this is the year 1944. much has happened since the nazi triumphs of 1940/'41. the united nations have inflicted upon the germans great defeats in open battle, man-to-man. our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. our home fronts have given us an
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overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war and placed at our disposal, great reserves of trained fighting men. the tide has turned. the free men of the world are marching together to victory. i have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty, and skill in battle. we will accept nothing less than full victory. good luck and let us all beseech the blessing of almighty god upon this great and noble undertaking. >> first is the danger of futility. the belief there is nothing one man or one woman can do against the enormous array of the world's ails, against misery, against ignorance, or injustice and violence. it is from numerous, numberless, diverse acts of courage such as these that human history is thus shaped. each time a man stands up for an
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ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance. >> june the 6th marks a number of significant events in u.s. history. yesterday was the 77th anniversary of d-day. and the 55th anniversary of robert kennedy's speech about human freedom to students in south africa. robert kennedy died two years later to the day. good morning and welcome to "morning joe." it is monday, june 7th. looking back, june 6th, joe, and those two major events, moving forward, too.
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>> yeah. ike's words still, overlaid with the imagines of the young men who fought, went up the cliffs of normandy and marched as ike said, marched towards freedom. he said the free men of the world are marching toward freedom, liberating a continent from nazi tyranny. i've got to say the two times i was there, two of the more moving times. and the first time on the 65th anniversary, i think, talking to those young men who by that time were in their '70s and some of their early 80s, remembering those times. and rfk, we always remember, june the 6th, as the day bobby passed away, tragically, but it was also the day two years before, to the date, that he was in south africa and delivered a
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speech that still inspires today, as you said. a speech that still speaks to us all of these years later. and of course, mika, his memory still alive and well. his spirit still alive and well. the inspiration that he provides millions of americans still very much real and with us today. also, mika, i've got to say, there's a third event that happened on june the 6th as well, isn't there? >> okay, yes, yes, it is. my daughter's birthday. i think that's what you're talking about. >> that, i am. >> yeah, 23, if you can believe it. i cannot believe it. with us, we have white house reporter for the associated press, jonathan lemire. author of "the washington post" early morning news letter, "power up," jackie alemany is with us, and founder of the conservative website, "the bulwark" and author of "how the
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right lost its mind," charlie sykes. it's good to have you all onboard this morning. >> and if you would talk to ontha lemire, he would tell you that there was a fourth thing that happened, but we're not going to include a red sox of the yankees into those other areas, jonathan lemire. >> i mean, not too far in terms of historical performance. but joe, i'll start by being serious saying that i was also at d-day at normandy two years ago for the 75th anniversary of that battle when president trump was there and i was part of the press pool covering that journey. it was beyond powerful. both of my grandfathers were world war ii veterans, they both served in europe. one of them had three purple hearts. he liked to say, the army taught him everything except how to duck. and to be there and see the rows and rows of crosses and the sacrifices that all of those american young men made, truly breathtaking, even so longer later. and as someone who grew up in massachusetts with pictures of the kennedys on the walls, rfk's
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words always carried great weight. and i know was a political hero to so many people, joe. and yes, i will just note that, of course, that was a pretty satisfying weekend in the bronx as well for the old town team. >> okay. well, with all of that in mind, democratic senator joe manchin of west virginia will vote against one of his party's proposed federal voting rights bills. >> i think there's a lot of great things i agree in that piece of legislation. but there's an awful lot of things that basically don't pertain directly to voting. >> so just to put a button on this, you will vote against that bill if it gets to the senate floor? >> i think it's the wrong piece of legislation to bring our country together and unite our country and i'm not supporting that, because i think it would divide us further. >> in an op-ed yesterday, senator manchin wrote in part, quote, the right to vote is our fundamental -- is fundamental to our american democracy and protecting that right should not be about party or politics. least of all, protecting this
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right, which is a value i share should never be done in a partisan manner. of course, some in my party have argued that now is the time to discard such bipartisan voting reforms and embrace election reforms and policies solely supported by one party. respectfully, i do not agree. i believe that partisan voting legislation will destroy the already weakening binds of our democracy, and for that reason, i will vote against the for the people act. furthermore, i will not vote to weaken or eliminate the filibuster. it is my sincere hope that all of us, especially those who are privileged to serve, remember our responsibility to do more to unite the country before it's too late. so what's the strategy there, joe? do you believe? >> i think he thinks it's a bad
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piece of legislation. and it's like what he said last week about the filibuster. joe manchin is the one that's taking the slings and arrows right now from the left, but there are a lot of other members in the united states senate that don't want to get rid of the filibuster. it just doesn't serve them well in their state to say so publicly. it serves joe manchin well. but on hr-1, we've been saying on this show for some time that hr-1 was not going to pass. i think it surprised a lot of people that we said it. and also, talked about how again, democrats in the senate said there was a lot of extraneous material in there that didn't deal directly with the challenges of what's facing this democracy right now. that there was a democratic wish list attached to it that was not directly related, again, to the challenges democrats, and really that america is facing, if you go state by state and look at some of the legislation that's
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actually allowing legislatures to possibly overturn election results. and, you know, actually, "the new york times" editorial board -- i'm not so sure it's popular in west virginia's joe manchin, probably not too popular with many republicans. but in an editorial friday, entitled congress needs to defend vote counting, not just vote casting, "the new york times" editorial board wrote this about hr-1. democrats in congress have crafted an election bill hr-1 that is poorly matched to the moment. the legislation attempts to accomplish more than is currently feasible, while failing to address of the clearest threats to democracy. especially the prospect that state officials will seek to overturn the will of voters. and that is, that is the real danger in these pieces of legislation, if you look the georgia, if you look in texas, where they're able to overturn
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the will of voters in a catchall phrase again. that's a problem. because the times goes on and says, there is little chance the bill will pass in its current form, democrats face a clear choice. they can wage what might be a symbolic and largely doomed fight for all the changes they would like, or they can confront the acute crisis at hand by crafting a more focused bill. and it goes on and on. i recommend that you read it. but jonathan lemire, this has been sort of a not-so-well-kept secret on the hill for quite some time, not only manchin, but other democrats did not like hr-1, it was too expansive, it was too clunky, there was too much thrown into it. it was too much of a wish list, that was never going to get 50 votes let along 60 votes. >> there were whispers behind the scenes that emerged at the forefront more loudly. and manchin's op-ed put the
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punctuation mark on it. and there's still some hope that the john lewis act, which some democrats have said all along should have been sequenced first would have some momentum. that there was some possibility there. that common ground can be reached. and that could be something that could be pushed into law later this summer. but it's not just on voting rights, it's also the filibuster. manchin had someone, let's just say, he is not unhappy with the attention. he recognizes, it is politically good for him to be in west virginia, to be seen as someone who says "no" at times, to both parties. republicans and democrats. and when he said, he was well aware that a lot of democrats are very frustrated with him, even though he votes with democrats more than not, but his answer to charles schumer and the majority leader and others is simply this. well, you're either going to get me from west virginia or you're going to get whoever replaces me, and that's not going to be a democrat. the idea being that he's the only democrat who can win in that deep red state, so there
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have you have to compromise with me. he has taken the example of senator robert burr, the legendary west virginia senator who really believed in the rules of the senate, that has helped inform manchin's belief on the filibuster. but he's not alone. he's willing to be at the forefront, to be the figure head of this movement, even among democrats, to not change or at least not to eliminate the filibuster. but there are others who quietly have the same reservations. and there is not any certainty whatsoever that there is enough sport, even just among democrats, forget republicans, to have such a fundamental change to such a piece of senate tradition. and that is something that the white house looks to push forward its agenda, is going to have to grapple with. >> so senator joe manchin is also a key vote, if any infrastructure bill is going to pass. and he remains confident a bipartisan deal is possible. >> i commend the president and senator capito, my colleague from west virginia, for continuing to work hard. they're working hard trying to find a compromise.
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they've come a long way. i have all the confidence in the world, chris, we're going to get there. >> senator mcconnell, the head of the republicans in the senate, says that he's 100% focused on blocking the biden agenda. question, aren't you being naive about this continuing talk about bipartisan cooperation? >> i'm not being naive, i think he's 100% wrong in trying to block all good things that we're trying to do for america. it would be a lot better since we're getting participation. i'll continue to keep work with my bipartisan friends, and hopefully we can get more of them. >> jackie alemany, what is joe manchin's calculus here? >> that's something i think that his democratic peers are still trying to figure out, as he refuses to acknowledge the reality of what mitch mcconnell has explicitly said, which is just this past month in may, saying that his focus is 100% focused on stopping the priorities of the biden
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administration. and i think that's the frustration we'll continue to see from democrats in a more public sense, a frustration with manchin that he's not so much, you know, has substantiative policy issues, with the biden administration's priorities, but that he is married to this idea of bipartisan. even during that interview with chris wallace, he very vaguely talked about his issues with hr-1, but really, his biggest issue was that there isn't a single republican that has signed on to the piece of legislation. i think that there would be more willingness to accept manchin's point of view from the democratic caucus if he was providing substantiative feedback on policy changes that he wanted, but we have really yet to see that. in terms of infrastructure, you know, there has been some bipartisan movement here. joe biden is going to be meeting with senator moore capito this afternoon. they'll continue to try to hammer out an infrastructure deal. biden has signified an openness
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to slimming down his original parch, and republicans have increased the number that they've put forward. but i think that that chasm between actually getting a deal is far greater than people realize at the moment. because joe biden has said that he wants all infrastructure investment to be new, to represent new federal investments, while republicans, you know, what constitutes as new in the infrastructure proposal that they put forward is only 300 billion of the total $900 billion spending. so i think that, you know, the bipartisan efforts are there, but it really remains to be seen whether, you know, republicans are negotiating in good faith, along with democrats, as well. >> jackie, thank you. donald trump's one-time 2016 campaign manager, corey lewandowski, conceded over the weekend that donald trump lost the election. the trump loyalist also dismissed reports that trump has been telling people that he
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expects to be reinstated as president this summer. lewandowski admitted that it's not legally possible and says the topic has not come up during his many conversations with trump in recent months. meanwhile, new e-mails show that in the last weeks of the trump administration, then chief of staff mark meadows pushed the department of justice to investigate conspiracy theories about the election. that revelation, according to a "new york times" report, shows meadows repeatedly asked acting attorney general jeffrey rosen to look at claims of fraud in the 2020 election. one email requested the doj investigate a fantastical theory that people in italy had used military technology and satellites to remotely tamper with voting machines in the u.s. and switch votes for trump votes for joe biden. "the times" reports none of the
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e-mails show rosen agreeing to open the investigation suggested by meadows and former officials and people close to him said that he did not do so. let's bring in the author of that report, justice department reporter for "the new york times," katie benner. she's also an msnbc contributor. katie, what more can you tell us? and are there any laws broken here? >> i'm not really sure that we saw laws broken, but we definitely saw policies violated. it's the justice department policy with the white house is very clear when it comes to matters of enforcement, nobody from the white house except maybe the white house council is supposed to be talking to the attorney general or the justice department. and that's to keep it from seeming like using the white house as political cudgel against enemies or as political tactics to try to legitimatize a conspiracy theory that former president trump won the election. you saw that policy very clearly
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violated here. and you also saw an attempt by the white house to legitimatize through the justice department some pretty crazy conspiracy theories, which is interesting, because there was a sense at the end of the administration, within the white house, as people scrambled to find a way to say that they had won, that it would be key for the justice department to somehow use its authority to bless these theories and to bless these tactics and say that there was a chance, when the justice department already determined that there was none, that there was a chance that trump had won. >> katie, mark meadows denied ever sending these. what's your response to his denial? >> you know, i didn't hear that he denied them. all i had been told vaguely was that he might not have remembered them, but the problem is, they are in possession of investigators for the house and the senate. so, i'm not really sure how that denial squares with congress' possession of his e-mails. >> well, with reality, actually.
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charlie. and of course, there was a disconnect with reality, of course, obviously, inside the white house. a huge disconnect. and my god, if american democracy was not hanging by a thread, it would be pretty funny that a chief of staff would be pushing italy gate, that a man from italy came over to change enough ballots to elect a president. by the way, anyone that read elena plat sunday's "new york times" cover story knows that even allen west mocked people that believed in italygate. and yet, here we are to actually -- i've got to straighten up here, because mika will get mad at me, charlie. i'm sorry for laughing a to the beginning of this question, because it really was so damned dangerous that these people were actually controlling the lever
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of powers in the last several months of the trump administration. >> yeah, think about that we're talking about here, joe. we're talking about the chief of staff to the president of the united states in the final days of the presidency trying to find a way to overturn a presidential election by embracing some of the most bizarre conspiracy theories you can imagine. words fail. i need to get back to the three thesaurus, delusional, deranged, crazy. every time you think you come up with an idea that is just too lunatic, what happens is, you find out that the president of the united states himself is embracing it and then he spreads it out and other people feel the need to act on it. here we are on this monday morning. we're talking about the possibility of italygate. the president apparently had spent time musing about the
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possibility of being reinstated. and we have to have explainers saying, by the way, no, you cannot be reinstated as president in august. i mean, really, we are talking about this. we're talking about this, because these crazy notions have been circulating in the white house, in the republican party, and you know, as i've said, joe, just because an idea is fake and ludicrous does not mean that it is not dangerous. and if millions of people believe this, it can create more anger, more outrage, and it can fuel the kinds of things that we saw on january 6th. so it's not just one big lie, it's the big lie metastasizing into new forms, and they can be very, very dangerous to american democracy. >> it's the russian fire hose of falsehood, which is a very deliberative attempt to spread to many lies. and the lies don't have to be
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consistent with each other, that you confuse, you overwhelm, and people like me laugh at such ludicrous lies, thinking nobody would be stupid enough to believe them, and well, actually, tens of millions of people do believe them. katie, i wanted to just -- just so we can educate people that maybe just started watching news over the past five years, younger americans, can you talk about that wall? there was such a solid wall between the white houses and the justice departments in the past. and if the wall was broken through, that become huge news. even on much smaller items than this. i go back to '93 during travelgate when one or two clinton officials went over and talked to a justice department officials about the wording of a press release. my god, republicans, you would have thought that it was
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watergate 2. it's just something that usually doesn't happen. but with the trump administration, all restraint was done away with. and there was a dangerous mixing of politics and law, time and time again. >> yeah, so to your point, historically, since watergate, there has been a really strong wall put in place between the justice department, which is the nation's top law enforcement agency and the white house. what we saw with nixon, he was using the justice department to win re-election. he was using the powers of the attorney general, the attorney general was helping him, and that was deemed very, very dangerous for a variety of reasons, not at least of which because it would erode the american people's faith that law enforcement, that the idea that we are all equal under the law was no longer something that we could believe in in america. so safeguards were put in place. primarily this idea that the white house and the justice department would not work together on something as serious as enforcement, as prosecution. you did not want it to seem like the justice department was being used to go after political
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enemies. well, fast forward to the trump era and we saw a president who very clearly did not believe in having that wall. he believed that attorney jeff sessions should have stepped in and ended the russia investigation into his campaign and the investigation into russia, full stop. he believed that bill barr should have helped him more in terms of helping to win re-election, in terms of talking about things like voter fraud, in terms of things like fears that mail-in ballots would end in fraud. he felt that the justice department should be his personal law firm and an entity that went after his enemies. as we've also seen in a myriad of leak investigations that he used to go after people like andrew mccabe and james comey, the former heads of the fbi, who also felt they were his enemies. so trump not only did away with that norm, he instated a new norm. he kind of instated this new idea that it was okay to politicize law enforcement and national security. and we're still living with the reverberations of that today.
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the fact that there are people who do not believe national security assessments over domestic extremism and its root causes is part of that politicization. the fact that we have people who believe in conspiracy theories that were debunked by trump's own justice department, by former attorney general bill barr is a result of that politicization. the fact that you can have a rally with trump, and he talks about the vaccine and says, takes credit for it, and people will not applaud, because they're so convinced not to believe in vaccines, that's also part of that politicization. so we'll have to deal with that for years to come. >> very well put. justice department reporter for "the new york times," katie benner, thank you very much. professor of history at yale timothy snyder puts forth this scenario about the 2022 and 2024 elections. quote, i have the cassandra feeling this spring, because it is so obvious where all of this is heading. president trump tells a big lie that elections are rigged. this authorizes him and others to seek power nor
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extra-democratic ways. the lie is institutionalized by state legislation that suppresses voting and that gives state legislatures themselves the right to decide how to allocate the electoral vote in presidential elections. the scenario then goes like this. the republicans win back the house and senate in 2022, in part thanks to voter suppression. the republican candidate in 2024 loses the popular vote by several million and the electoral vote by the margin of a few states. state legislatures, claiming fraud, after the electoral count vote, the house and senate accept that altered count. the losing candidate becomes the president. we no longer have democratically elected government. the big lie is designed not to win an election, but to discredit one. any candidate who tells it is
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alienating most americans and preparing a minority for a scenario where fraud is claimed. this is just what trump tried in 2020 and it led to a coup attempt in january 2021 of. it will be worse in january of 2025. joe, i -- this is chilling to me. what do you make of that? >> well, i think it should be chilling to everybody, to republicans, those republicans who actually stood up for democracy on january the 6th, and there were quite a few who voted to support the election, for democrats, who are obviously very concerned where this is going. and charlie, i will say, i have been -- i think i have been far too -- far too dismissive over the past five years that things could get as bad as they could get. i kept saying, we will right the ship, things are going to go in
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the right direction, you look at the 2017, 2018, 2019 election results, it shows that the american people are going to have a check against this. but boy, you look at 2020, and all of those republicans that we were saying, good for them! the young guy up in michigan that did the right thing, the republicans in arizona that refused to back down, that actually said, no, you know, we lost the election, we've counted the votes, there's no -- all of those people have been purged by the republican party. or certainly a lot of them have been purged. and i said it inarticulately earlier. everyone is always talking about these specific provisions in these voting right bills. about, oh, you've got to start voting at 1:00 instead of noon, and there aren't going to be as many drop boxes. that's not the stuff that steals elections. democrats will figure out a way
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around that. parties do. the frightening part that makes this possible are those catchall phrases where suddenly the secretary of state is not in charge. and suddenly, you see all of these bills passing that will give state legislatures power to go back and actually reverse, if they are of corrupt heart and mind, to reverse the election results in 2024. >> you know, i would really very much like to say these concerns are paranoid and hysterical, but i don't think that's the case. what we've seen over the last four or five years is the way that the unthinkable becomes the thinkable. and as you're watching the republican party morphing into all of this, attacking the legitimacy of democracy is central now to donald trump's politics. keep staying relevant, getting back into office. the republican party is either embracing it or looking the other way. so you ask, you know, the
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scenario that timothy snyder lays out, which republicans are you going to stand up against that? which republicans are going to push back against that? you've named the ones that played a decisive role in 2020, will they be around in 2025? will they be willing to stand up. over the weekend, the governor of georgia was booed at the state convention. the secretary of state of georgia was censured. everyone who did the right thing in the republican party is facing the possibility of ex-communication. well, so keep looking around going, at some point, the grown-ups in the party will stand up and push back against this. and i think you've seen this again and again. easter the other thing. if republicans convince themselves that the election was, in fact, stolen. if they believe the big lie, they will rationalize and justify anything the next time around. they won't think that they are stealing the election. they will think that they are stealing it back. and at that point, you get into this loop, where each party says
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that all of our tactics are completely justifiable. by the way, i'm referring to the republicans who clearly have decided that whatever they do at the state level is justified. by the way, i also think that you're exactly right to focus on this question of whether or not legislatures can overturn the popular vote. that's the big flaw of hr-1. it does not focus like a laser beam on the immediate clear and present danger to the elections. that's the issue that i think people ought to be asking, would they be willing to overturn a clear verdict of the voters, to seize power again? and i think that that is not a crazy or far-fetched scenario at this point. >> charlie, this is possible for one reason. it's possible because a lot of our friends, you and me, a lot of our relatives, a lot of our fellow travelers, over our entire adult lifetime, a lot of people that we fought for small
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government with, that we fought to strengthen alliances against russia and china and a lot of these people now -- and i talk to them, and again, i went to church with them for, you know, my whole life, they are -- they're getting news sources for conspiracy websites across the globe. from conspiracy websites across the globe. and they will ask me, well, what about this italy thing? what about -- and they believe it. and by the way, these aren't local yokels. these are people with, as i explain all the time, advanced degrees that have business majors, they're hedge fund people, they're lawyers, and yet, they're believing conspiracy websites and are willing to throw democracy away over it. >> i continue to be amazed by
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this, joe. as long as we have seen it, as long as -- as many times as we have talked about it, and that's why i use that term, the doom loop of crazy, where you have an idea that is so bizarre, maybe it's in the far reaches of the fever swamp, and then somebody like my pillow guy starts to advance it and you attempt to roll your eyes, but before you know, the former president of the united states is going, well, maybe that's possible. and other people are saying, well, we're just asking questions. and you begin to realize millions of people believe this. it doesn't matter what my pillow guys or what donald trump thinks. if tens of millions of people think that donald trump is the legitimate president of the united states, we are in a dangerous, dangerous place. and so, whatever we thought was happening back in 2017, when we were worried about fake news or worried about disinformation, all of that has gotten worse.
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and i have to say that it's very difficult to cope with the questions you're asking. what do you do when you have normally savvy, intelligent, sophisticated people who are willing to believe this sort of thing? you know, when the disease has gotten, you know, has spread, like a pandemic, a pandemic of crazy, that we have no treatment and no vaccine for. >> such a good question. charlie sykes, thank you. we'll continue to struggle with it here on "morning joe." straight ahead, golfer jon rahm was leading field by six strokes, joe, after the third round of the memorial and then gets yanked from the tournament because of a positive covid test. we'll tell you how he reacted to that decision by pga officials. plus, new york city mayoral candidate maya wiley is our guest after she nabbed the
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endorsement of a progressive star over the weekend. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. shingles? oh... you mean bill. he's been a real pain. again with the bill... what? it looks like a face. ...hearing about it 24/7 is painful enough... i don't want to catch it. well, you can't catch shingles, but the virus that causes it may already be inside you. does that mean bill might have company? - stop. you know shingles can be prevented. shingles can be whaaaaat? yeah prevented. you can get vaccinated. oh, so... i guess it's just you, me and bill then. i'm making my appointment. bill's all yours... 50 years or older? get vaccinated for shingles today. stay restless, with the icon that does the same.
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welcome back. some of the other stories we're following that are making headlines this morning, vice president kamala harris has arrived in guatemala for her first foreign trip in office. the vice president will meet with leaders from the northern triangle, guatemala, honduras, and el salvador. she will also meet with mexico's president on finding solutions to the root causes driving mass migration, such as poverty and crime. with just over two weeks to go until the democratic primary for new york city mayor, candidate maya wiley picks up an endorsement from one of the biggest names in progressive
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politics. new york congresswoman ocasio-cortez announced her support for wiley on saturday and maya will join us next hour, right here on "morning joe." to the pga now, where patrick cantlay earned the fourth victory of his tour career winning at the memorial tournament for a second time after besting collincollinmorec. but some 24 hours, the notion that cantlay and morikawa would be vying for the first place finish seemed possible. that's because the tournament appeared to belong to jon rahm, who pulled away with a six-shot lead in saturday's third round that tied the 54-hole memorial set by tiger woods. but as he walked off the 18th green, rahm was informed of perhaps the only thing that
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could beat him. a positive covid test. on monday, the tour notified rahm that he was subject to contact tracing protocols because he had come in close contact with someone who had tested positive. he had tested negative until saturday, when a test came back and he was later confirmed as positive. rahm expressed his disappointment on twitter, writing in part, this is one of those things that happens in life. one of those moments where how we respond to a setback defines us as people. and that's true, too. joe? >> you know, it is. and first of all, i really don't know where our pga golf commentator, richard haas, is, this morning. he obviously overslept, to talk about this, but jonathan lemire, that's just heartbreaking. here's a guy who spend his
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entire life waiting for this sort of moment. he's actually -- he's tying tiger woods' 54-hole record at the memorial and he is on his way to victory. just, man, i would say, double-mask me, triple-mask me. let me continue playing this. it is really heartbreaking. at the same time, you know, i think the crowds are going to get bigger for him and you talk about having sympathy of the fans and the supporters and yes, the endorsers. i think his great attitude is going to serve him well moving forward. >> yeah, i'll do my best to fill richard haas' sizable golf spikes and step in on this. what a surreal scene. and your heart breaks for rahm, who of course handled it with class and said the right things about needing to be safe and prioritizing his health and his family's health. i question slightly whether or
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not he needed to be notified on the course like that and had to break down in front of everyone. it was heartbreaking for him, and we hope he will be okay. but a reminder, that as much progress as the country has made, extraordinary progress the country has made in recent weeks because of the vaccine and we're seeing the return of the big crowds in sporting events all over the place, covid is still here. and it's still going to be a fact of life for sporting events and other things. >> that is heartbreaking. i also wondered this weekend, jonathan, whether it was really necessary for the new york yankees to play without paper bags over their heads. these are kids. i think too often we forget that these are kids, the young men, and to endure that type of humiliation night after night after night against your boston red sox, i just thought it was unnecessarily cruel by major league baseball. give them paper bags next time they play boston. >> it did seem like a competitive disadvantage there, joe. i will say, speaking of crowds,
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the ones at yankee stadium, it's a socially distant setting. they'll have fuller capacity in the coming days. i had to be at a game this weekend. and the best way to watch a yankee game is when there aren't that many yankee fans around you. and i enjoyed that immensely as we got the sweep. and we were talking about it over the weekend. these are two comeback wins. there's something there. it's early june. the season has a long way to go, but this red sox team is a lot of fun and they have playing with a lot of heart. >> we have a couple of things going also, mika. before your news story. there appears to be a curse that my boys and i bring the red sox when we watch them play. we're 0-4 while in attendance. but lemire and his boys, 2-0 in yankee stadium. when the sox go to yanky stadium, jonathan has to bring the kids there. but the rays, man, rays are just on fire. they keep winning.
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red sox, one game behind. blue jays, your toronto blue jays are in third place. it's six games out, and the yankees, who would have been believed it, six and a half games out. it is a long season. there's a reason they play 162 games. wouldn't surprise me to see the yankees start hitting the ball. they're not hitting right now. i wouldn't be surprised to see the yankees at the top at the end of the season, so way too early to take anything from these standings. >> u.s. gymnast simone biles appears ready for this summer's olympic games in tokyo, now just 46 days away. biles completed an historic weekend in ft. worth, texas, last night, winning her seventh all-around u.s. gymnastics championships title, which gives her the most wins at the event by any woman in american history. biles is now tied for the most
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by any american man or woman. amazing. coming up, job openings soar and wages are up, so why aren't americans rushing to fill those positions? steve rattner joins us with his charts next on "morning joe." it charts next on "morning joe. as your business changes, the united states postal service is changing with it. with e-commerce that runs at the speed of now. next day and two-day shipping nationwide, and returns right from the doorstep. it's a whole new world out there. let's not keep it waiting. so then i said to him, you oughta customize your car insurance with liberty mutual, it's a whole new world out there. so you only pay for what you need. hot dog or... chicken? only pay for what you need. ♪ liberty. liberty. liberty. liberty. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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no other major economy in the world is growing as fast as hours. no other major economy is gaining jobs as quickly as ours. and none of the success is an accident. our plan is working. and we're not going to let up now. we're going to continue to move on. >> that was president biden reacting to the latest jobs report friday.
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steve rattner and tax policy expert and professor of law at emory university, dorothy brown. so steve rattner, i'm looking through these numbers and here is, here is a contrast, it is striking. job participation, the number of people looking for jobs fell last month, while job openings soared to historic heights. explain those two things. less people looking for jobs last month, despite the fact that job openings are at historic highs. >> well, joe, you gave me a great lead-in into my chart. we had a decent jobs number on friday. not quite what people hope for, but better certainly than april. but the really interesting news is what you just pointed to, which has to do with labor force participation and job openings. and what's been happening in this economy, and what you can see in this chart, on the left-hand side, is that people looking for work, job seekers,
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gradually rose before the pandemic. and as you would expect, it plummeted. and as you would also expect, it began to come back. but what was probably less logical or less expected was that it then stagnated, bounced up and down a little bit, and that red circle with the little line down it is what you just alluded to, which is that the number of adult americans looking for jobs actually fell by a little bit last month. and contrast with the chart on the right, which is job openings, and you can see a pattern you'd expect. the economy was doing okay, job openings are reasonably high. economy falls off a cliff. economy starts to recover, job openings come back. and now they have soared to over 8.5 million. that is an all-time record number of job openings in this country. so the conundrum, obviously -- >> so how do you explain that? how do you explain that less people are looking for jobs, while we have record job openings? >> well, there are a variety of
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explanations, joe. and like everything that goes on these days. it seems to be somewhat politicized. one explanation is the effect of the $300 a week of extra unemployment insurance that many americans are getting. other people say that their child care issues, their public health issues, some baby boomer types have decided simply to retire from the labor force. leave the labor force, depressing the size of the labor force. this is going to be a fruitful study for economists for a very long time. but let me show you what the impact of all of that is starting to be on wages. so this looks at just blue collar wages in leisure and hospitality, among our lowest paid professions. and you can see that it was on a trend line to continue to go up from about $14.50 to about 15 an hour right before the pandemic. and you can see a dotted extrapolation of where it would have gone in a normal world. and then the pandemic hits. not surprisingly, wages fall. businesses lay off a lot of
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people. hire fewer people, hire lower prices, or they simply cut pay. so wages bounce along, along the bottom. and then you have this phenomenon of a lot of job openings, and not so many people looking for the jobs. and so it's forced businesses to raise their wages. and now you're in a situation, where for a hotel worker, for a bar worker, a restaurant worker, not all of them, obviously, but on average, they're receiving ages of $16 an hour, just is under $16 an hour. which is above where we would have been in all likelihood, had the economy just been on present course and speed. and the big question is, will business try to pass these costs along? this is great for workers. let's not kid ourselves. this is what we want to see happen for workers. but it will add to costs for business. and will businesses add these costs alone or will they absorb them? one other interesting phenomenon i want to show you on the politics of all of this, it's pretty amazing. this map shows every state based
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on who the governor is. whether the governor is a republican or a democrat. and in every state in which a republican is the governor, except for massachusetts and vermont, and we can argue about how republican those states are, anyway. every single republican state except those two has decided to eliminate the extra unemployment benefits before the early september expiration. every blue state, blue governor, blue state, has not decided to do that. in other words, is keeping the $300 a week until it expires, at least for now, in early september. so this is like many things in life today, this has not become a matter of economic policy. it's a matter of almost becoming political philosophy. and when it's all over, we're going to find how much of an effect these higher unemployment benefits had on jobs versus all the other things that are going on in the economy, joe. >> exactly. and dorothy brown, i'm curious, when we look at the reason behind these trends, there is
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debate. and it does get political, but is it possible that many of the reasons are true at the same time? >> well, first i want to say, yes, there are workers who are making higher money, but so are ceos. that's the chart we also could be talking about, right? significant pay increases during a pandemic, while they're cutting staff, ceo pay has increased. and then i can talk about the pew research study that showed about two-thirds of unemployed americans are thinking about what they want to do going forward. do they want to go back to the job they had? is the job they had even available for them to go back to? or do they want to re-examine their field and their occupation? and two-thirds said they did. so we talk about a 5.8% unemployment rate, but it's 9.1% for black americans and 7.3% for
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hispanic americans. 1.8 million fewer women in the workforce and 7.5 million overall fewer jobs. this economy is not back for everyone. and what a lot of workers have seep during the pandemic is the employer they thought they were working for is not necessarily their employer, right. they worked from home, but they were surveilled. they had employers checking up on them. and you didn't necessarily think that was the kind of employer you worked for. so, yes, it makes sense for people to say, you know what, i don't think i want to go back there. >> steve rattner, let's talk about the biden administration. and we showed that chart of the republican governors letting the benefits expire early, the unemployment benefits expire early. the biden administration seemed
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to send a signal last week that it was not overly concerned if republican governors let that $300 extra benefit expire early. i'm curious what your thoughts are on that. do they believe that that will move more people into the workforce and make unemployment numbers go even higher? >> i think if you read a little bit between the lines, but not a lot in what president biden has been saying, he did say a month or so ago after the last jobs report came out and was disappointing that in order to receive unemployment insurance, every american should be looking for a job. that's a provision that's not always enforced and it wasn't enforced at all during the pandemic. and so it was, i think, a signal that the president is saying that people can't simply decide they're unemployed and out of the workforce. they have to be looking for a job in order to get the unemployment insurance. so that's a positive thing. and i do suspect, although they
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haven't really said it, quite frankly, that the biden administration is aware that the difference in how these states behaved is what could well effect levels of unemployment. and i do think, look, anecdotally, i talk to businessmen all day, every day, pretty much. and to a person, they will tell you, it is really hard to find people and they're having to cut back on some of their sales and production because of that. and to the point that was made a second ago, it does appear that people are being more choosey about what jobs they take. there was a survey i saw the other day that about half the people that are looking for a job want a job that allows for remote work. well, half the country can't be working remotely, unfortunately. so i think the pandemic has altered people's views about work, whether they want to go back to work, whether they feel any pressing need to go back to work. and i think the $300 a week plus the stimulus checks, plus certain other benefits have
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played a role in all of that. >> professor brown, it's jonathan lemire. over the weekend, treasury secretary janet yellen secured commitments from members of the g-7 about the 15% minimum tax. of course, now, it gets that much harder if such a thing is going to happen in congress to sign off on it, too. can you speak about the revocations of what this deal means, both globally, but the path ahead for putting it in place here at home and what it could mean domestically? >> well, i think a minimum tax is critical to preventing tax havens and companies from evading and avoiding income tax. paying their -- i would say, their fair share. and i think president biden or, i think securing this abroad is obviously a hundred times easier than securing it at home, right? we don't see a lot of support,
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certainly not bipartisan support. and i don't know if in the senate, there are 50 democrats that would support it, but the minimum tax is critical to stem the bleeding of our tax dollars escaping our borders. >> all right, dorothy brown and steve rattner, thank you both. the ap's jonathan lemire is still with us. and joining the conversation, we have nbc news capitol hill correspondent and host of "way too early,," kasie hunt, dave weigel, and the former senior adviser for the house oversight committee, kurt bardella, a columnist for "usa today" and the "l.a. times" and an adviser to the dccc now. good to have you all onboard now. so democratic senator joe manchin of west virginia will vote against one of his party's proposed federal voting rights
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bills. >> i think there's a lot of great things that i agree with in that piece of legislation, but an awful lot of things that don't pertain directly to voting. >> so just to put a button on this, you will vote against that bill if it gets to the senate floor? >> i think it's the wrong piece of legislation to bring our country together and unite our country. and i'm not supporting that, because i think it would divide us further. >> dave weigel, are you shocked that there's gambling in this place? this is -- this was the worst-kept secret for a very long time. manchin was letting people on the hill. he didn't like hr-1. he thought it was this democratic grab bag of wish lists. and so, yet, that's been the democrat's conversation overwhelmingly over the past month or so, that this is a top priority. what do they do now that joe manchin has said the quiet thing out loud? >> well, if the past is prologue, it will be like the
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$15 minimum wage, where a vote is held. there's pressure to hold the vote. in this case, you have the senate majority leader saying that he wants the vote in june. and you're not going to have 50 democratic votes to advance it. what you heard the senator say in this clip is what you hear from not democratic leaders, but some democrats outside congress, which is hr-1 is a good negotiating position, if you want to pass some sort of bill that attacks the things democrats are worried habit happening in the states, that wouldn't be hr-1. that would be something that's more tailored to gerrymandering, that empowers the justice department to do pre-clearance again, which was taken away in the court's shelby decision. there are ways to go after what democrats worry about. what you hear democrats saying is a threat to democracy that don't include, for example, the campaign finance provisions in hr-1. so watching this from covering more campaigns to covering the day-to-day of congress, you have felt this debate separate from the things democrats are most
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concerned about than trying to stop. hr-1 does not necessarily stop all the things they're doing. and some of the provisions, that took longer, that manchin said, are not -- are things in hr-1 that are probably gauchable if this thing actually got to a vote that could get 60 and proceed. >> and kasie hunt, we all saw several weeks ago, maybe it was a month or two ago now, the days all blur together in baseball season, but joe biden speaking before the nation, talking about this grand, sweeping vision. which most people said was the most progressive vision they've ever gone through. the biggest agenda that we've ever saw any president in our lifetime speak about. and here we are a month or two later. and it appears that grand vision may be -- it's not shipwrecked on the rocks of political reality, but it is moving toward the rocks pretty quickly. and it doesn't look like joe manchin is going to do anything
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to change the course of that ship of state, so to speak? what happens next? how does joe biden salvage even a small part of that vision of his, because forget about 60 votes. he can't get 50 votes for a lot of these things. >> and that's always been the question, joe. and you're right. the policies that he came out of the gate with, i mean, they surprised even people like alexandria ocasio-cortez, who looked at them and was like, wow, i wasn't expecting president biden to be the one that would put this forward. but that said, biden has known all the way along and frankly campaigned as someone who was careful about not going too far on issues like the police, for example, and other places. he maintained throughout the democratic party that he was in the right spot for the party and for the country many a general
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election. so, i think in some ways, these rocks are places where joe biden himself may feel more comfortable that be with what was put out initially. joe manchin is out front, taking the heat for a handful of other democrats who don't have as easy as a time doing this. as we've talked about here, he's from west virginia. where all of this stuff is not a problem at all. there are other senators from places like virginia, arizona, georgia, where, you know, it's not quite as easy to be the one that's taking all the arrows on issues like this. but where they're still going to face tough re-election battles. so i think the question is, is mitch mcconnell and republicans serious about doing this work? so far, i haven't seen the evidence of that. shelly moore capito has been out there. we'll see if these infrastructure talks become a real thing this week. i think manchin puts a little bit more pressure on those talks to bare fruit. but mcconnell has blocked the january 6th commission
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investigation. so there's still a lot of questions here. democrats, i think, are in for a frustrating year and a half. >> yeah, democrats may have the majority on capitol hill, but barely. and their hope of keeping control is a facing a huge challenge. a postmortem report of the 2020 election conducted by several democratic advocacy groups shows the party failed to present a cohesive economic agenda. and struggled to counter republican efforts to tie all the democratic candidates to the far left. as "the new york times" notes, it follows a separate report by the dccc, which showed democrats had an insufficient response to attacks that framed them all as police-hating socialists. the findings say the party is at risk of losing ground with black, hispanic, and asian american voters. let's bring in the host of msnbc's "politics nation" and
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the president of the national action network, reverend al sharpton. what do you think of that? >> i think that clearly the battle has been trying to get some of the things that the democrats ran on and won on to become actually a reality in terms of legislation, of police reform, voting rights, and other things along those lines. what matter to rank and file people is where the democrats deliver at this point. i think the president acknowledges that, that we could see that in his speech in tulsa last week. but promises made must be promises kept. there is a reason there was record turnout among blacks and latinos last year. and rather than dealing with the back-room posturing, people want to know, are you going to deliver for what we delivered the vote for? if not, you're going to run into a lot of dismay.
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>> you know, rev, you talked over the past several years about latte liberals. and it struck me looking at the surprising election results -- by the way, i want to clear this up, because i talk about conspiracy theories and one of the conspiracy theories is that donald trump had this extraordinary year, but he still lost. republicans picked up around ten seats. bill clinton lost ten seats when he won in '92. kennedy lost 22 seats. joe biden did far better than most people by picking up three senate seats. just on that conspiracy theory, you can put that one to the side. biden did, as well, if you look at the house and the senate together as most. but it was expectations that were so blown out of proportion
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because of these polls. and rev, on that point, part of the reasons why democrats underperform, you talk about latte liberals and you talk about how part of the democratic base is way too progressive for rank and file members, white, black, hispanic asian americans. how did that play in? do you think that played into democrats having a blind spot, thinking it was just about trump, when at the end of the day, it was about jobs, it was about wages, it was about the things that elections usually are about? >> the reason that many were against trump were because of those issues. jobs and situations on the ground. and i think what i've always tried to say to my friends that i call latte liberals, some of them are friends, some of them are not, is that you cannot get caught up in an echo chamber of just talking to yourself and not
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talking to the people on the ground. sometimes they speak for people that they do not speak to. people are suffering. so yes, we want to deal with policing, but deal with the proper policing and gun control, because we are being killed on the streets. so the questions, i think, become academic to some. you know, joe and mika, i preach actual funerals. do you know the trauma you go through looking at people in a casket. that's a lot different than sitting in an ivory tower reading statistics. that is the reality that people live in and with every day. and unless the f party dresses that and understands that, many real life, they will lose those people that they gained last year, because those people voted, and they will have gains for them, because they felt that they understood them, not that they were just talking about them from some talking points that they came out of an ivory
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tower, debriefing session. >> and kurt bardella, you're consulting the dccc. i'm curious, what do you think about this report and what do you think democrats need to do to be more competitive coming up in 2022? >> you know, joe, one of the first axioms that i remember when i first started getting into to politics, elections are decided by answering the question, are you better today than you were the day before. and i think if these midterms can be about that question, it should be an unresounding success for the democratic party. when you look at the condition of this country. how it's changed, just having competency and trust and honesty returned to the upper echelons of our government, we've seen how we can emerge from this covid winter and put people in a position to live their lives again, get out and get jobs.
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i think where democrats have struggled in the past is allowing republicans to label them with this ridiculous title of being the extreme party. let's be very clear here. the extreme party in america is the one that's fighting democracy. it's the one that doesn't want to investigate what happened on january 6th. is the one that claims to be for law and order, but doesn't have the backs of the capitol police officers who put their lives and livelihood on the line, protecting them on january 6th. so i think democrats have to do two things to be competitive. one, they cannot let republicans off the hook for continuing to whitewash the events of domestic terrorism that happened on our capitol and backyard on january 6th. they need to be the ones that show that the republican party is the dangerous one. they're the ones in rooted in conspiracy theorys and detached themselves from reality. and secondly, democrats need to show that they are the party of reality, which means that they hear first hand what the
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conditions is of people in this country. that they're there for communities of color, for asian americans, latinos, african-americans. they need to make it personal. they need to make it about their stories. they need to make the economy personal. the economy isn't some intangible thing that our -- you know, just summed up on by charts. it's affecting real people. kitchen table issues. if democrats can make it about that, they can be successful. >> so, dave, i'm curious, you obviously have spent so much time going to the states that were polled so badly, yet on seven states -- i remember the seven states of wisconsin, the seven states of pennsylvania. we, of course, showed those polls that showed joe biden was going to win by 143 points in wisconsin, two weeks out. and i'm curious -- and forgive me for asking this question in june, but you've had six months now to look over everything that, you know, all of your notes, you're still going out
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there. have you figured out the disconnect, why the democrats underperformed so badly in the house and the senate races? have you figured out, is there a disconnect between the national democratic party and the rank and file voters in wisconsin and pennsylvania and other states and florida that the national democrats just never picked up? >> i think in both '16 and '20, this is an easy excuse for democrats to cite, but there was a change to the turnout model from having donald trump on the ballot. there are voters who don't normally turn out who turned out for him. without that, they have had a pretty okay 2021, quite frankly. you had at this point four years ago democrats winning a bunch of state legislative elections. they weren't competitive in two years earlier. you haven't had republicans flip anything. you mentioned wisconsin. the big race in wisconsin this year was a race for school
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superintendent. big job right now given the debate over reopening schools and covid. democrats, it's an un-partisan race, but the democratic candidate won by 15 points. and you had in this new mexico race last week, republicans ran on the message that they ran in 2020. it was incredibly effective. you had the first time in about a century that somebody joined a cabinet and then raced to replace them in the house. their party did better than the new cabinet secretary had done in their last election. without that trump turnout, you had republicans sweating, what happened with their base. on saturday, republicans did gain this nonpartisan mayor's office in mccallan, texas. republicans lost ground in suburban dallas. they lost ground in suburban ft. worth. they lost the ft. worth city council. they're not actually -- compared to most parties that take power and watch their base fall asleep, democrats are much more
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engaged than other parties have been at this point. not that everything's great in 2022, but you have not -- to look at the way republicans have rallied around trump, you would think, they fixed their problems, they're flipping seats. they're absolutely not right now. >> all of this as the investigation into the january 6th attack of the capitol continues to widen. federal prosecutors say they expect to charge at least 550 people in connection to the attack. that's up from an earlier estimate of 500. according to an nbc news talley of court cases, there has been a total of 490 charges so far. so far, 464 people charged in federal court and 26 charges in washington, d.c., superior court. more than 900 search warrants have been issued nationwide. let's read from the piece by atlantic staff writer, adam serwer. it's entitled "the capitol rioters won." and adam writes in part, quote,
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for the trumpist base defined by the sense that a country that belongs to them is slipping away, a future full of elections contested by a right-wing party and a slightly less right-wing party would be an ideal outcome. trump's election was, among other things, a gesture of outrage from his supporters at having to share the country with those unlike them. successfully restricting democracy, so as to minimize the political power of rival constituencies would mean at least as far as governing the country is concerned that they would not have to. most elected republicans have repudiated the violence of the capitol riot. but they share the belief of the rank and file, that the rioters' hearts were in the right place. and joe, that's -- i mean, that's the most unbelievably frustrating part of this. this was an attempted coup.
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this was, you know, i will keep the emotion at a minimum here, but this was an attack on our democracy, as it was in process. this was a terrorist act. it was as bad as anything else that we have seen in history that we look at as a dark, black moment in history. and yet, their hearts were in the right place? are you kidding me? >> i mean, when people show you who they are, believe them the first time. and again -- well -- >> i think -- i think there are people who have shown us that they're anti-democratic. certainly not just the rioters, but those who defend the rioters over and over again. the seditionistsseditionistsist insurrectionists, the people who voted against the election. the people who voted not to certify those votes. and jonathan lemire, the rank and file republican party. and it was always convenient for
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us to blame donald trump and some hacks in congress for what was happening from 2017 to 2020. harder to do that when you have anybody that speaks out against the conspiracy theories, getting censored, getting sanctioned by the republican party. you have, of course, liz cheney, who is kicked out of leadership for telling the truth about what happened on january the 6th. they literally -- a modern american political party kicked somebody out of leadership for condemning an insurrection against a united states government. let me just say that again. i'll slow that one down for a second. a political party in america this year, in 2021, kicked out a member of leadership for telling the truth about an insurrection against the united states of america.
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and so, that's where they are. you have people like ben sasse, who spoke out against it, who got sanctioned and basically mocked the nebraska republicans who were sanctioning. you know, and you can -- you can go through it. these people that actually did what they were supposed to do, removed from their jobs. you had this weekend, brian kemp, the trumpiest of all trump governors this side of ron desantis, booed. you had secretary of state, who is also a trump supporter, again, he was sanctioned by the state party, all because they would not overturn the election results. so, yes, this is, again, we can't be shocked every day by it. we have to recognize there are three parties in america, a republican party, a democratic party, and an ill liberal
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anti-democratic insurrectionist party. that's just where we are as a country. the question is, what do we do about it now? >> joe, there are exceptions. you mentioned some of them. liz cheney. mitt romney is another who got booed at his state convention because he didn't support the decertification of the electoral college victory. but this is where the republican party is right now. and yes, we can call it a portion of the trumpist party, but they put the "r" next to their name. and this is where the party is right now. and it's the rank and file. you see the polling. think about it time after time, a majority of voters who identify themselves as republicans do not think that joe biden was legally elected. they do not believe that he has a legitimate claim on power. and it is because of the doubts sowed by former president trump, the way it was amplified in the conservative media. the way that so many republicans simply did his bidding in perpetuating and propagating these lies. now we have trump stepping out on to the public stage again
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with an appearance last week, rallies to come. so, kasie, i wanted to ask you about two things. first, if you can provide an update on whatever house speaker pelosi is doing to look into january 6th, sips the senate killed the official commission commission. but the biden administration is priding themselves on being results oriented. we have seen the covid vaccine program be a wild success. but right now, it seems like there's roadblock after roadblock after roadblock to all of these pieces of agenda. you as well as i know how nervous democrats get. that's happening already. they fear they're not going to have much more to show for this in the next year and a half and they could suffer consequences in 2022. what are you hearing? >> i do think to your point about democrats being nervous about these things, yes, there is some nail biting going on. i think it's partly because they know that these first two years of the biden administration, it
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could be their only shot. history would say they're likely to lose seats in the house. potentially, they could lose seats in the senate, although i think they're more confident that they'll continue to hang on to the senate. but without that, things get so much more difficult. that's part of why what joe manchin sort of definitively did over the weekend. we know this is where he stood, but he really drew a line in the sand. and that presents some serious challenges for democrats as they try to figure out how to move this forward. on january 6th, democrats are still weighing their options there. there seems to be some support for a select committee to investigate it, a little bit like the select committee on benghazi, but there are potentially some risks there, because we all know how political that was and what the view was, you know, among people across the country. so, you know, i do think there's a reluctance to politicize what happened on january 6th, but, you know, the reality is, you know, i think at this point, the
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ship has sailed, as we have been pointing out and talking through. with the commission's demise and the republican decision that they have to essentially look the other way, there's not much else to be done here. and one question i do have based the conversation we've been having this morning, too, about the respective bases of the party, and to pick up on dave weigel's earlier point, i think it's possible that in some ways the focus on trump and the republican party embrace of trump may just be actually activating the democratic base more than it's activating those republican or at least temporarily republican voters who came out, because they wanted to vote for donald trump. >> well, look what happened in georgia. you had republicans who believed the election was rigged and did not go out as much as they did when donald trump was on the ballot. and allowed joe biden to actually pick up three senate
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seats. which, again, other than barack obama, his landslide in 2008 and ronald reagan's landslide in 1984, that's the best any winning president has done, picking up senate seats since, well, since reagan -- since, well, '76, other than those two. so, dave, i'm curious, just following up on what you said, i do wonder if sometimes we're always fighting -- not you, of course, but many of us in the press are always fighting the last war. when we overlook the fact that, one, democrats didn't go door-to-door, knocking during covid, republicans did. and i've always said, that get out the vote part of campaigning makes a difference, but also, donald trump had and jared kushner showed me early on, had this extraordinary, this extraordinary get out the vote operation where they were
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tagging and tracking people at every trump rally over four years, and they built up this extraordinary get out the vote machine and knew where every voter was and knew how to get them out. i wonder if too often we forget that the republican party is not operating on that high of a level right now. >> well, it's in pretty good shape. you left behind the republican party that has the same leadership and uses these tactics. they lost a couple of people, not many in the january 6th backlash. they have the infrastructure to be more competitive, but look, you're going to see this primary election in jn tomorrow, for example, this is an election for governor of new jersey, governor of new jersey, typically not a job that has a lot of power over monitoring the last election. but even there, you have a republican primary where a fringe candidate has kind of fought his way, probably not to victory, but fought his way into the story line. just by being the most pro-trump candidate and saying the election was unfair, that trump
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probably won. you do have, and kasie was pointing to this earlier, you have this bind where the republican who does the most to generate excitement from the base is not doing the stuff that you just mentioned, which is getting people excited about an election. he didn't even tweet about -- or sorry, he couldn't have. he didn't even talk about the statement, this new mexico election, for example. you have him talking a lot and reminding democrats, this is a reason to vote. but in all of these elections that we're talking about, up to 2024, it's going to be more people voting than the presidential. so who excites that smaller pool of people. at the moment, trump is not doing it in a very efficient way. >> and when trump is not on the ballot himself, trump would be the first to tell you, republicans just aren't going to do as well. so that's why 2022 is going to be so fascinating and eve a lot of unknowns there.
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a lot of us just assume because of history and redistricting, the republicans, it's going to be a slam dunk for republicans, but democrats have a few advantages breaking their way, too. kurt bardella, earlier, jonathan lemire asked about what sort of commission should be set up. talk about a commission that nancy pelosi could set up in the house. you were there during benghazi. you saw how republicans set up benghazi and used it to their advantage. but what is the most bipartisan commission that the speaker could set up that while it will still get takd by republicans anyway, at least americans could see it as being a fair look at the events that happened on january the 6th. >> yeah, joe, she could put together a select committee that looks a lot like what a 9/11-style bipartisan commission would have looked like. have an equal number of republicans and democrats. the key thing here is you
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empower the chairman of that committee, which should be a democrat, to have unilateral subpoena authority. to have the ability to call hearingings. the idea this is a partisan issue is running cover for the people who committed this insurrectionist act. the way you get past that is the hearings that you have, the first people you call as witnesses are those capitol police officers. no one can accuse them of being partisan. no one can accuse them of having some crazy radical liberal progressive agenda. you put them front and center to tell their story, their firsthand testimony of about what they saw, what they felt, what they experienced, put that on tv, put that front and center and dare the republicans to sit there and say, this was just another day at the tourist capitol. this was just a bunch of friendly, peace-lovelying patriots exercising their rights. dare them to make that case in
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front of those capitol police officers who sat there and stood there and, you know, held their ground while being assaulted, attacked, had bare spray put on them. like any kind of select committee, and joe knows this from having been in congress, the hearings are where you can define and set that image, that tone of what it could be about. and i think if democrats do a select committee, and they structure it in a way where there's an even number of members, but are able to have that type of hearing, that type of presentation, i think that can go a long way with showing the american people what their intention is and how any effort to try to call it partisan or a stunt or a political games, i think that having capitol police front and center takes that away from the republican party.
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>> let the story speak for itself. kurt bardella and dave weigel, thank you for being on this morning. still ahead on "morning joe," one of our next guests hopes a new endorsement from a progressive star will help her break through the crowded race to be new york city's next mayor. civil rights attorney and candidate maya wiley joins us. plus, a federal judge strikes down california's assaults weapons ban, comparing the popular ar-15 to a swiss army knife. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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we have an option of a candidate who can center people, racial justice, economic
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justice, and climate justice. that didn't just come up to run for mayor, but has experience and has a lifetime of dedication to this. and that candidate is maya wiley. >> all right. new york congresswoman alexandria ocasio-cortez over the weekend endorsing maya wiley for mayor of new york city. and maya joins us now. it's great to see you back on the show, maya. congratulations on the endorsement. how is your campaign and the focus of why you want to be mayor changed over time, since the last time you were on the show when you were exploring. >> well, it's great to be with you, mika, and to see you. look, we're so excited. we have actually changed nothing. i have been running as maya
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wiley since the beginning of this race. and what is so exciting about having congresswoman ocasio-cortez endorsement along with the entire brooklyn delegation, hakeem jeffries, is that it's really about the fact that i am the only candidate in this race that has a true position for police reform and, you know, it's been so much so that we actually had one candidate after this announcement, eric adams, attack me, a black woman and mother, and civil rights lawyer, and attack ocasio-cortez, someone who grew up in one of the poorest zip codes in this city and has served in a classroom, attacked us because we are calling for the courage to invest in our communities, in the strategies that are proven
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to keep us safer. and you know, what we saw over the weekend was the proof point. we had a 10-year-old boy shot and killed in far rockaway queens. and at the same time, there were police in riot gear pushing people out of a public park violently. that's exactly the point. when we have strategies that are proven to bring gun violence down in communities and take care of our kids, because it's trauma-informed care. because it starts where someone has been hurt and actually tracks back and provides support services, that we bring gun violence down on 40% in places like the bronx. but instead, we're actually paying for a militarized police force. so we want to shift money, not so that we don't have police. we want police focused on the
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job of policing, we just want to do it smartly. and balance that with the right investments, in what actually keeps us safe. and is proven to pull violence down. and i've been saying since day one and since we were alking over the summer about what was happening after george floyd. >> so, maya, while you were talking, our producers put up some of the things that you supported. and one of it says, cut nypd budget by $1 billion and freeze nypd cadet classes for two years of putting it back up again. so you believe that cutting nypd's budget by $1 billion and freezing cadet classes for two years will actually bring gun violence down? how? it's about shifting our resources to what we know works. because, first of all, we know we're wasting dollars in the new york city police department, as we saw in washington square
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park. that isn't safety. but tying people, pushing them with bikes, that's not what keeps us safe. but what we do know, and congresswoman ocasio-cortez and congressman jamal were up at jacoby hospital calling for $400,000 to support a program that has brought gun violence down with violence interruption out of jacoby hospital, as support services. by 40% 40% and higher. it's proven. it's happened over a period of years. our point is, we're going to invest in what actually keeps us safe, including the police department focused on the jobs of policing. but what we've been seeing so much of is not the job. and i want to point one other thing out, because this is so
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important, joe. that the talking points that we are hearing in a democratic primary from a candidate eric adams running as a democrat are the talking points we have heard from mitch mcconnell, blaming those of us who are progressive, who are simply looking at what is smart and proven and fact-based, as the folks responsible for crime, when what we know is that crime, in fact, gun violence in the communities we're talking about, it's the same communities that have had gun violence in 1993, the highest rates of gun violence. what we're doing is taking the courage of the path of facts and investment our people, and in a partnership with policing that is smarted and focused, and the right balance, because that's what's going to keep us safe. and that's what's going to create a better relationship with the police department. because what we saw in
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washington square park, what we saw over the summer with peaceful protests, that's exactly what drives a wedge between police officers and the community. and when we build up community-based services and supports and create a relationship with the police department where they recognize their role and they know when to stand down and back off, we have good relationships and less crime. >> maya, reverend al sharpton here. let me ask then, you are saying that you are not part of -- because some of your supporters are part of saying defund the police, one. and second question, those opponents that you are running against have raised that you were the head of the civilian complaint and review board and sided in more cases, supporting police, than against police on some of the things that you were raising. and many of the victims, the
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mother of eric garner, has supported someone other than you, maguire, supporting eric adams. how do you deal with the fact that some of the victims are saying that you are on the other side when you were in a position to do something about it? >> well, thank you, rev. and let me just say, you know, one of the most awful things i have ever had to do was send a form letter to the family of eric garner about the fact that we have sent the case of daniel panthelao over to the police department, not because i wasn't extremely grateful to finally get that case, over to the police department, which is ultimately what got him off the force. and thanks to you and thanks to the organizing and work of the family that wouldn't let the issue die, with -- >> it took us five years!
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five years! >> yes, but, well, i became the chair of the ccrb in 2016. and first thing i started doing was to make sure we were pulling that agency together, which was in trouble. making sure we created an advocacy arm and senior position for the agency. and making sure we got the case over to the police department. so i got it over there in the year that i was there. and my point is exactly this. if i had been mayor of new york city, as soon as there was a donald trump administration and the barak -- unfortunately, the administration of president barack obama, who i support, had not gotten that case to a criminal prosecution in federal court, for federal civil rights charges, daniel pantheleo would have been off the force. but this is our point. i'm the only candidate in this race that has called for real
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police accountable, which is truly civilian accountability, in a civilian police commissioner, which is a civilian commission with final say, not just on the accountability side of whether or not there's been misconduct, taking that away from the police commissioner. but making sure it is civilians who set the patrol guide. the rules of the road. because one of the issues that we face and all, frankly, accountability faces, is if we give such wide discretion to police officers and aren't very clear on what is okay to do and what is not okay to do. like, camden, new jersey, did. 18-page excessive force policy for the police department. we've got four pages. we leave all kinds of gray area, and when you do that, you leave all kinds of room that make it difficult to hold police officers accountable. we're going to make it fair, by being very clear with police what's okay and what's not.
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but we'll make sure that civilians are setting the ruling. >> you're saying that you would structure the civilian complaint review board in the mayor's office so there would be real civilian oversight over some of the police cases? how are you saying that that is going to structurally change if you were mayor? and how does the mayor have the power to do that? >> so, first of all, what happens right now is the ccrb does not have the decision-making authority over discipline, right? but the ccrb sends recommendations to the police commissioner. the police commissioner has final say. what i -- but there's also another thing we don't talk enough about, rev, that i know you know. which is that we have a tremendous number of police misconduct cases that don't even come to the ccrb. they go through the police department and then up to the police commissioner. i'll pull all of that together into one place into a civilian
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commission that sits on top of the police department to set the priorities of policing, that says you're going to focus on keeping illegal guns of our communities and off our street. that's going to partner with communities, make sure we're setting the right priorities. that is also going to focus on the rules, the patrol guide, setting them, and then it's going to be the final decision maker in all discipline, so matter nowhere the discipline comes from, the recommendations will go to a civilian oversight body, not to the top brass of the police department. >> hey, maya, it's jonathan lemire. good to see you this morning. i wanted to shift gears slightly and talk about the city's economy, which was dealt a major blow during the pandemic, from working class folks in the outer boroughs to the idea of commercial release and these offices in manhattan being empty. and we know what an economic engine for the city that is. can you talk about your plan to bring back the city's economy and in particular, you know, you just received the endorsement from congresswoman ocasio-cortez. she opposed the amazon deal on
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long island city. she places unnecessary burdens on those businesses, but of course, proponents for it advocate that the environmental safe guards are so needed. so walk us through, how are you going to thread that needle? what is your plan for bringing the city's economy back? >> thanks for that question, jonathan. look, by using our resources wisely, that stimulate our economy back, but i'm going to do it in a way that makes sure we're bringing all of our communities back, all of our people. new york always recovers from a crisis. it's one of the things that makes us new york. we pull together and get it done. but what we've never done is recover every one of us from a crisis. and just like we were talking about with public safety. the community that was the highest rates of gun violence are the same communities that twice the unemployment rates before covid and whose unemployment rates jumped to
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16%, 18%, even more if you're between 18 and 24 during and after covid. so what we are going to do is use things like our capitol construction budget, which i'm going to double, to $10 billion. andbillion, and create 100,000 new jobs, including local targeted hiring so people need those jobs the most. also are getting those jobs to build things we need built and fix things we need fixed like more affordable housing, resilience in the face of climate change. we have 520 square miles of coast in the city. we have to deal with rising sea levels and make sure we are resilient in the face of it. that gets us back to work. when we talk about vacancy, i think it's important to see not just it as a crisis but as an opportunity. because it's an opportunity for us to make sure that we have more happening in terms of jobs
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and job centers in every single borough, particularly as more people are working remotely. but i'm also going to make sure women are taken care of in this economy. because women have been decimated. fact, women of color have -- the care economy and caring for children and elderly adults have had the greatest job losses and no rebounds. 88% job loss. this is the thing. we can create universal care centers, dropoff centers, which is in my plan. part of what i'm going to use, a shift in resources in the police department to pay for it. >> thank you very much for being on the show this morning. we appreciate it. up next on "morning joe," a vaccine slowdown. officials worry a covid outbreak could be possible in some states this summer. we'll explain that ahead this morning on "morning joe."
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i saw a survey that actually showed, rev, you would be one of the most influential people in new york politics. it traced you and de blasio and cuomo. are you going to endorse anybody in this mayor's race? >> i'm looking at the fact that we need someone in the city that can raise the right issues, be an advocate, but also manage. we cannot underestimate the impact that this pandemic has had with all of the small businesses closed, which a lot
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of jobs gone. so you need the balance. we also cannot underestimate the fact that we have a problem of policing, but also a problem of gun violence. so you need one that really will deal with reforming police but at the same time will deal with how we have the right policing to protect citizens. i'm looking for someone that can manage and advocate, not just advocate and not manage or not just manage and can't advocate. i honestly feel, unfortunately, my candidate is not in the race. i wanted to support mika because anyone that can manage or handle joe could handle new york. >> yeah. she would scare a lot of people. i don't know about that. she's a tough one. you do need it. the new york mayor has to be tough. it is the hardest political job in america, i think, year in and year out. also, you are going to be
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meeting with joe manchin. we will talk about joe in a few minutes. you and other civil rights leaders will meet with joe manchin tomorrow. what's on your agenda? >> we have set up this meeting that we're going to talk with senator manchin. it is to really try and find out, is his appeal for a bipartisan approach to things -- how real is the bipartisan spirit in the senate? whether civil rights leaders can address them on some very serious and pertinent issues that affect our community. you know, i remember when you had republicans -- when i was a kid -- that worked with civil rights community leadership. if manchin can be a bridge to try to bring us together on things like police reform and voting rights, without
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sacrificing the basic core beliefs that we have, we need to have that discussion. so it's a conversation, not a confrontation. >> all right, rev, thank you. more from senator joe manchin up next as he comes out against that voting rights bill that every other senate democrat not only supports but have co-sponsored. "morning joe" is back in a moment. and new adventures you hope the more you give the less they'll miss. but even if your teen was vaccinated against meningitis in the past they may be missing vaccination for meningitis b. although uncommon, up to 1 in 5 survivors of meningitis will have long term consequences. now as you're thinking about all the vaccines your teen might need make sure you ask your doctor if your teen is missing meningitis b vaccination.
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soldiers, sailers, you are about to embark upon the great crusade toward which we have driven these many months. the eyes of the world are upon you. the hopes and prayers of people everywhere march with you. in company with our brave allies and brothers in arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the german war machine, the elimination of nazi tyranny and security in a free world. your task will not be an easy one. your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened. he will fight savagely. this is the year 1944. much has happened since the nazi triumph of 1940 and '41. the u.n. have inflicted upon the germans great defeat in open battle, man to man. our air offensive has seriously
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reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. our home front have given us a superiority in weapons and placed at our disposal great reserves of fighting men. the tide has turned. the free men of the world are marching together to victory. i have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. we will accept nothing less than full victory. good luck and let us all beseech the blessing of god upon this great and noble undertaking. >> first is the danger of futility. the belief there is nothing one man or one woman can do against the enormous array of world's ails, against misery or injustice and violence. it is from numberless acts of
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violence that the belief that human history is shaped. each time a man stands up for an idea or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance. >> june 6 marks a number of significant events in u.s. history. yesterday was the 77th anniversary of d-day. the 55th anniversary of robert kennedy's speech about human freedom to students in south africa. robert kennedy died two years later, to the day. good morning and welcome to "morning joe." it's monday, june 7th. looking back, june 6th, joe, and
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those two major events moving forward, too. >> yeah. ike's words still overlaid with images of the young men who fought, went up the cliffs normandy and marched, as ike said, marched towards freedom. he said the free men of the world are marching toward freedom, liberating a continent from nazi tyranny. i have to say that two times i was there, two of more moving times. the first time on the 65th anniversary, i think, talking to those young men who by that time were in their 70s and some in their early 80s, remembering those times. rfk, we always remember june 6th as the day bobby passed away tragically. it was also the day two years
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before, to the date, that he was in south africa and delivered a speech that still inspires today, as you said, a speech that still speaks to us all these years later. of course, mika, his memory still alive and well. his spirit, still alive and well. the inspiration that he provides millions of americans, still very much real and with us today. also, mika, there's a third event that happened on june 6th as well, isn't there? >> oh, yes. yes, it is, my daughter's birthday. i think that's what you are talking about. >> i am. that i am. >> 23, if you can believe it. i cannot believe it. with us we have white house reporter jonathan lemire, jackie
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alamany is with us and author of "how the right lost its mind" charlie sykes. good to have you on board this morning. >> if you talk to jonathan lemire, he would tell you there was a fourth thing that happened. we're not going to include a red sox sweep of the yankees into those other areas, jonathan lemire. >> not too far off in terms of historical importance. joe, i will start by being serious by saying, i was also at d-day two years ago for the 75th anniversary of the battle whether president trump was there. i was part of the press pool covering that journey. it was beyond powerful. both of my grandfathers were veterans. they served in europe. one had three purple hearts. he liked to say the army taught him everything except to learn how to duck. to be there, to see the rows of crosses and the sacrifice that all those american young men
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made, breathtaking, even so long later. as someone who grew up in massachusetts with pictures of the kennedys on the walls, rfk's words carried great weight and was a political hero to so many. yes, i will note, it was a satisfying weekend in the bronx. >> okay. >> with all of that in mind, joe manchin of west virginia will vote against one of his party's proposed federal voting rights bills. >> i think there's a lot of great things i agree in that piece of legislation. but there's an awful lot of things that don't pertain directly to voting. >> just to put a button on this, you will vote against that bill if it gets to the senate floor? >> i think it's the wrong piece of legislation to bring our country together and unite our country. i'm not supporting that, because i think it would divide us further. >> in an op-ed yesterday, he wrote in part, the right to vote
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is fundamental to our democracy and protecting that right should not be about party or politics, least of all protecting this right which is a value i share, should never be done in a partisan manner. some have argued now is the time to discard bipartisan reforms and policy supported by one party. respectfully, i do not agree. i believe that partisan voting legislation will destroy the already weakening binds of our democracy. for that reason, i will vote against the for the people act. i will not vote to weaken or eliminate the filibuster. it's my sincere hope that all of us, especially those who are privileged to serve, remember our responsibility to do more to unite this country before it's too late. what's the strategy there, joe,
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do you believe? >> i think he thinks it's a bad piece of legislation. it's like what we said last week about the filibuster, joe manchin is taking the slings and arrows from the left. there are other members in the united states senate that don't want to get rid of the filibuster. it doesn't serve them well in their state to say so publically. it serves joe manchin well. we have been saying for some time that hr-1 was not going to pass. it surprised a lot of people that we said it. talked about how, again, democrats in the senate said there was a lot of extraneous material in there that didn't deal directly with the challenges of what's facing this democracy right now, that there was a democratic wish list attached to it that was not directly related, again, to the challenges democrats and, really, that america is facing
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if you go state by state and look at some of the legislation that's actually allowing legislatures to possibly overturn election results. actually, "the new york times" editorial board -- i'm not so sure it's popular in west virginia as joe manchin. probably not popular with many republicans. in an editorial friday entitled "congress needs to defend vote counting, not just vote casting," "the new york times" editorial board wrote this about hr-1. democrats in congress have crafted an election bill hr-1 that is poorly matched to the moment. the legislation attempts to accomplish more than is currently feasible, especially the prospect that state officials will seek to overturn the will of voters. that is the real danger in these
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pieces of legislation, if you look in georgia, if you look in texas where they are able to overturn the will of voters in a catchall phrase. that's a problem. "the new york times" says, there is little chance it will pass in its current form. democrats face a clear choice. they can wage what might be a symbolic and largely doomed fight for all the changes they would like, or they can confront the acute crisis at hand by crafting a more focused bill. it goes on and on. i recommend you read it. jonathan lemire, this has been sort of a not so well kept secret on the hill that not only manchin, but other democrats did not like hr-1. it was too expansive. it was too clunky. there was too much thrown into it. it was too much of a wish list that was never going to get 50 votes, let alone 60 votes. >> joe, you are right. there have been whispers behind
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the scenes that emerged to the forefront more loudly in recently weeks. in terms of hr-1, there's still hope that the john lewis act, which some democrats have said all along should have been sequenced first, would have some momentum. there's possibility there that common ground can be reached. that could be something pushed into law later this summer. it's not just on voting rights. it's also the filibuster. manchin has -- let's say, he is not unhappy with the attention. it's politically good to be seen as someone who says no at times to both parties, republicans and democrats. he is well aware that a lot of democrats are frustrated with him. his answer to schumer and the majority leader and others is this, you are going to get me from west virginia or you are going to get whoever replaces me. that's not going to be a
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democrat. the idea being that he is the only democrat who can win in that deep red state. therefore, you have to compromise with me. he has taken the example of senator robert bird, the senator who believed in the rules of the senate, that helped inform manchin's belief on the filibuster. he is not alone. he is willing to be at the forefront, to be the figurehead of the movement, even among democrats to not change or not eliminate the filibuster. there are others who quietly have the same reservations. there's not any certainty whatsoever that there is enough support even among democrats, forget republicans, to have such a fundamental change to such a piece of senate tradition. that's something the white house looks to push forward in its agenda is going to have to grapple with. still ahead, as donald trump pushed conspiracy theories to the public, his chief of staff was doing the same behind the scenes. new reporting shows how mark meadows pressed the justice
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department to probe multiple unfounded claims of voter fraud. we will talk to the reporter who broke that story just ahead on "morning joe." facing leaks takes strength. so here's to the strong, who trust in our performance and comfortable long-lasting protection. because your strength is supported by ours. depend. the only thing stronger than us, is you. ♪ na na na na ♪ na na na na... ♪ hey hey hey. ♪ goodbye. ♪ na na na na...
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new emails show in the last weeks of the trump administration, mark meadows pushed the department of justice to investigate conspiracy theories about the election. that revelation according to "the new york times" shows meadows repeatedly asked the acting attorney general to look at claims of fraud in the 2020 election. one email requested the doj investigate a fantastical theory that people in italy had used military technology and
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satellites to remotely tamper with voting machines in the u.s. and switch votes for trump to votes for joe biden. none of the emails show rosen agreeing to open the investigations suggested by meadows and former officials and people close to him said that he did not do so. let's bring in the author of that report, justice department reporter for "the new york times" katie benner. what more can you tell us? are there any laws broken here? >> i'm not sure that we saw laws broken. we saw policies violated. the justice department contact policy with the white house is clear, when it comes to enforcement, no one from the white house, except for perhaps counsel is supposed to talk to the justice department. that's in order to keep it from seeming like or keep it from being in reality an attempt by white house to use investigations and to use enforcement against enemies or
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political tactics, for example, to try to legitimatize a conspiracy theories that former president trump won the election. you saw that clearly violated. you saw an attempt by the white house to legitimatize through the justice department some crazy conspiracy theories. there was a sense at the end of the administration, that it would be key for the justice department to somehow use this authority to bless these theories and to bless these tactics and say there was a chance, when the justice department determined there was none. >> katie, meadows denied sending these. what's your response? >> i didn't hear he denied them. i had been told he might not have remembered them. the problem is they are in possession of investigators for the house and the senate. i'm not really sure how that
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denial squares with congress' possession of the emails. >> with reality, actually. and, of course, there was a disconnect, charlie, with reality, obviously, inside the white house, a huge disconnect. if american democracy was not hanging by a thread, it would be pretty damn funny that an idiot chief of staff was actually pushing italy-gate, a conspiracy theory that satellites and a man from italy came over and changed enough ballots to elect a president. by the way, anybody that read the sunday "new york times" cover story about the gop in texas knows that even allen west mocked people who believed in italy-gate. and yet, here we are. i have to straighten up because
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mika will get mad. i'm sorry for laugh agent the -- laughing at the beginning of the question. it was so dangerous that these people were controlling the lever of power in the last several months of the trump administration. >> yeah. think about what we're talking about here, joe. we are talking about the chief of staff to the president of the united states, in the final days of the presidency, trying to find a way to overturn a presidential election by embracing some of the most by -- bizarre conspiracy theories you can imagine. delusional, deranged, crazy, this is the republican's doom loop of crazy. they are caught in. every time you think you come up with an idea that's too lunatic, you find out the president of the united states himself is embracing it and then he spreads it out and other people feel the need to act on it.
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here we are on this monday morning, we are talking about the possibility of italy-gate, the president apparently had spent time musing about the possibility of being reinstated. we have to explain, by the way, no, you cannot be reinstated as president in august. really, we are talking about -- we are talking about this because these crazy notions have been circulating in the white house, in the republican party. you know, as i have said, joe, just because an idea is fake and ludicrous does not mean that it is not dangerous. if millions of people believe this, it can create more anger, more outrage and it can fuel the kinds of things that we saw on january 6. it's not just one big lie. it's the big lie metastasizing into new forms many they can be very, very dangerous to american democracy.
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coming up, perhaps the only thing that could beef golfer jon rahm over the weekend, a positive covid test. the surreal moment he learned about it while still on the course. "morning joe" is back in a moment. we face the world head on. we never hide. let's get to work. ♪ ♪ that's what i'm talking about.
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from the ground up, helping to make san francisco the greenest big city in america but we couldn't do it without you. thank you, san francisco. gracias, san francisco. -thank you. -[ speaks native language ] let's keep making a differene together. another day, another chance. it could be the day you break the sales record, or the day there's appointments nonstop. with comcast business, you get the network that can deliver gig speeds to the most businesses, and you can get the advanced cybersecurity solutions you need with comcast business securityedge. every day in business is a big day. we'll keep you ready for what's next. get started with a great offer, and ask how you can add comcast business securityedge. plus, for a limited time, ask how to get a $500 prepaid card when you upgrade. call today. tonight, i'll be eating a pork banh mi with extra jalapeños. [doorbell rings] thanks, baby. yeah, we 'bout to get spicy for this virtual date. spicy like them pajama pants. hey, the camera is staying up here. this is not the second date.
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♪♪ welcome back. some of the other stories we are following that are making headlines this morning, vice president kamala harris arrived in guatemala for her first foreign trip in office. the vice president will meet with leaders from the northern triangle. she will also meet with mexico's president on finding solutions to the root causes driving mass migrations such as poverty and crime. with just over two weeks to go until the democratic primary for new york city mayor, candidate maya wiley picks up an endorsement from one of the biggest names in progressive politics, new york congresswoman
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alexandria ocasio-cortez. to the pga, where patrick cantlay won after besting collin morikawa. some 24 hours earlier, the notion that cantlay and morikawa would vie for the first place finish seemed improbable because the tournament appeared to belong to jon rahm who pulled away with a six-shot lead in saturday's third round that tied the 54-hole memorial record set by tiger woods. as he walked off the 18th green, he was informed of perhaps the only thing that could beat him. a positive covid test. on monday, the tour notified rahm he was subject to contact tracing protocols because he had
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come in close contact with someone who had tested positive. he had tested negative until saturday when a test came back he was confirmed as positive. rahm expressed his disappointment on twitter writing, this is one of those things that happens in life. one of those moments where how we respond to a setback defines us as people. that's true, too. joe? >> well, it is. first of all, i really don't know where our pga golf commentator richard haas is this morning. he obviously overslept to talk about this. jonathan lemire, that's heartbreaking. a guy spends his life awaiting for this moment. he is actually -- he tied tiger woods' record at the memorial. he is on his way to victory.
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i would say double mask me, triple mask me, let me play this thing. it's really heartbreaking. at the same time, you know, i think the crowds are going to get bigger for him. you talk about having sympathy of the fans and the supporters and, yes, the endorsers. i think his great attitude is going to serve him well moving forward. >> yeah. i will do my best to fill richard's golf spikes and step in on this. what a surreal scene. your heart breaks for rahm who seems like he handled it with class. he said the right things about needing to be safe and prioritizing his health and his family's health. i question whether or not he needed to be notified on the course like that. have to break down in front of everyone. it's heartbreaking for him. we hope he will be okay. a reminder that as much progress
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as the country has made, extraordinary progress, the country has made in recent weeks because of the vaccine and we are seeing the return of the big crowds in sporting events all over the place, covid is still here. it's a fact of life for sporting events and other things. >> that's heartbreaking. i wondered this weekend whether it was really necessary for the new york yankees to play without paper bags over their heads. these are kids. too often we forget these are kids, the young, young men. to endure that type of humiliation night after night after night against your boston red sox, i thought it was unnecessarily cruel by major league baseball. give them paper bags next time they play boston. >> it did seem like a disadvantage there. speaking of crowds, the ones at yankee stadium, they have not fully returned. they will have fuller capacity in the coming days. i had the occasion to be at the game this weekend. i will say the best way to watch a yankee game is when there
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aren't that many fans around you. >> amen. >> i enjoyed that as we got the sweep. we were talking about it over the weekend. the two comeback wins, there's something there. it's early june. the season has a long way to go. this red sox team is fun. they are playing with a lot of heart. >> we have a couple of things going also, mika, before your news story. there appears to be a curse that my boys and i bring the red sox when we watch them play. we are 0-4 while in attendance. lemire and his boys, 2-0 in yankee stadium. when the sox go to yankee stadium, jonathan has to bring the kids. the rays, man, are just on fire. they keep winning. red sox one game behind. blue jays six games behind.
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it's a long season. there's a reason they play 162 games. wouldn't surprise me to see the yankees start hitting the ball. they are not hitting right now. i wouldn't be surprised it see the yankees at the top at the end of the season. way too early to take anything from these standings. coming up, a federal judge calls california's ban on assault weapons a, quote, failed experiment that has had no affect on mass shootings. what the ruling to throw out that ban means for the future of gun laws in america. "morning joe" is back in a moment.
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♪♪ [announcement on pa] introducing togo's new cheese steak melt, featuring fresh artisan bread, layered with tender seasoned steak, sautéed mushrooms, roasted red peppers, and smothered with melty american cheese. the new cheese steak melt, now at togo's. [announcement on pa] how far would you go for a togo? welcome back. plummeting vaccination rates are threatening president biden's goal of getting shots to at least 70% of adults by july 4th.
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according to the seven day analysis by "the washington post," the u.s. is averaging fewer than 1 million shots per day, a decline of more than two-thirds from the peak of 3.4 million in april. the slowdown is national, with every state down at least two-thirds from its peak. to meet the goal, 4.2 million adults per week will need to get their first dose. joe? >> scott gottlieb was out earlier saying that it has slowed down a good bit. we're not going to get to the null the president wanted or health care experts wanted us to get to. he still believes we're going to be okay this summer. he believes enough people have been vaccinated that -- i know there's a concern about a second wave coming up. right now, at least, dr. gottlieb is believing that we
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have not enough vaccinations but that we're in pretty good position right now as we head into the summer. >> some experts are concerned that a summer surge in covid cases in states where vaccine rates are lagging. a "new york times" analysis found 15 states, many in the south, where half of adults or fewer have received a dose. in two states, alabama and mississippi, it would take about a year to get one dose to 70% of the population at the current pace of distribution. if there is a summer surge, experts say it likely won't be as severe as last summer. we will keep watching that. now to the search in california for a man and woman suspected in the road rage killing of a 6-year-old boy.
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arrests were made in the case yesterday. >> reporter: overnight the california highway patrol announcing the arrest of the driver and passenger believed to be involved in the fatal shooting of a 6-year-old boy during a road rage incident last month in orange county. authorities identifying them as marcus eriz and wynne lee. >> even though we made arrests, we still have search warrants to execute and evidence to collect. >> reporter: her young son was going to kindergarten on may 21st. driving on the 55 freeway near orange when another vehicle cut her off. >> as i was merging, i heard a loud noise and i heard my son say ow, he had been shot. >> reporter: he was taken to
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children's hospital but did not survive. the arrest happened on the same weekend as the memorial service. >> i felt honored to be his mommy. we will never forget the day you were taken from us. however, the joy of your memory will forever live on within our hearts. >> reporter: the arrest bringing a sense of relief to residents, family and friends, knowing the people accused of taking the life of a little boy are now in custody. on the topic of california and judge, a judge overturned the state's 32-year ban on assault weapons, calling it a failed experiment and emphasizing people's constitutional right to bear arms. the u.s. district judge of san diego ruled the state's definition of illegal military-style rifles unlawfully
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deprived residents of weapons allowed in other states. the judge writes that modern weapons are used for legal reasons. quote, like the swiss army night, the popular ar-15 rifle is a perfect combination of home defense weapon and homeland defense equipment, good for both home and battle. california governor newsom called it a threat to public safety and the lives of innocent californians. the state vowed to appeal. joining us is the state attorney. dave, what do you make of the ruling? >> good morning. this was the first federal court ever to overturn a ban on assault weapons. it's bad enough he compared an
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ar-15 to a swiss army knife, but it's worse he did so in the very first sentence of the 94-page opinion. when i started the opinion, i thought it would be buried. no. he wanted everyone to see his comparison. he was proud of it. it didn't take him long to attack the media in the opinion on page 2. he attacked the media for spreading lies about the ar-15. it's the tone of his opinion that undermines its credibility. i think a lot of people were turned off once they get past the first sentence in comparing a weapon of war to something that campers use to unscrew wine bottles in front of a fire. he said it was a failed experiment, because there are a lot of incidents in gun violence. you can't prove a negative. i think it's a bad argument to say all these acts of violence,
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the law failed. how do you know how many acts of violence were averted by the law? the fact that people are violating the law does not mean the law should go away. we have laws against murder and there are a lot of people still committing murder. there's no one saying we should drop murder laws from the books. i disagree with his reasoning. >> it seems, dave, intentionally combative, intentionally offensive comparing an ar-15 that's been used to gun down students across campuses, across this country. you could make a constitutional argument here. it could be thought out. you could look at heller. you could take from heller the language used there, the 2008 case that actually recognized for first time the right to keep and bear arms, the second amendment meant what it said.
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there could have been arguments drawn from that about guns and common usage. here to say it's good for self-defense at home, which is stupid, unless you own a castle. i can talk offline to anybody who wants to know how to defend themselves better at home. have a shotgun, first of all, and -- we will talk about what else you would need. then to say it's good for battle. good for home -- defense of home but also homeland defense. this is survivalist idiocy. to think there's a federal judge on the bench that is basically nodding and winking to people that are getting military-style weapons so they can shoot and kill like members of the army or police officers whether they
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-- when they come to their homes. unsettling. >> he has a track record on this. he has been a big pro second amendment guy. he gets a lot of these bills and he overturns them. he wants clearly to get this law and this case in front of the u.s. suprmbolden. he saw there were three new supreme court justices. he thinks he can get all assault weapon bans overturned throughout the country. he can use rhetoric that owns the libs. i'm not sure he will succeed. you brought the heller case -- 2008, you are correct. justice scalia wrote that opinion. it found for the first time that individuals had a right to bear arms outside of the militia context, justice scalia did say the second amendment is not absolute, you can have restrictions on gun ownership. he had a test.
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the question is, is the firearm commonly owned by law abiding citizens for lawful purposes, like a handgun? in this case, you are talking about assault weapons. that's why he compared it to a swiss army night. if it's that common -- is it commonly used? then it passes the heller test and you can't ban it outright. >> right. that's a constitutional argument that could be made. the constitutional argument could be made that so many ar-15s have been bought that it's in common use like handguns or shotguns. that is a constitutional argument that not only can be made, we should expect it to be made in front of the supreme court, because after heller the supreme court has decided time and again much to the chagrin of clarence thomas not to take second amendment cases. i think they will take second amendment cases and going to be.
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it's going to be very interesting to see if they follow scalia's line of reasoning or take a more dramatic approach, which a lot of gun rights -- i'm a gun rights advocate. but extreme rights advocate want them to take. i still don't think at the end of the day they're going to find that an american has a constitutional right to have an ar-15 or military-style weapon. i think that's going to be as it is now, as it was with scalia and heller, reserved to the individual states to make those decisions. kasie hunt, do you have a question for dave? >> yeah. it's actually exactly along these lines. just because, the comparison to the swiss army knife really struck me. we know, i think, that congress certainly isn't going to pass an assault weapons ban again any time soon. what are you looking for? what are the next steps here?
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is there another review process before it gets to the supreme court if they decline to take the case? does it just stand in california? explain how this affects other states. >> it goes to the ninth circuit appellate court in california. . the state of california is appealing. no one can go out to buy assault weapons in california yet. i expect the ninth circuit to issue a stay on the ruling and then the case. the ninth circuit will overturn the judge's decision and you can go to the u.s. supreme court. he's emboldened by the new conservative 6-3 majority. comparing it to a swiss army knife is an insult to the victims of all of these mass
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shootings. ten days ago in the miami area, there were three assailants who open fire on a crowd outside at a rap concert, they fired 100 round of ammunitions, they shot 22 people and killed two of them. i can assure you, ar-15 in the hands of these individuals, changed for swiss army knives, there would not be any grieving, families mourning the loss of their family right now. the start of pride month last week. ronna mcdaniel tweeted. pete buttigieg responded, those
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with deeply held religious believes are often the parents who forced lbgtq children out of the home and onto the street. i have met with those kids. revisit your party's platform before you open your mouth about pride. chasten buttigieg is joining us now. >> first of all, tell us how much your life has changed the last six months and how is it going? >> it is an adjustment to d.c., not quite use to the heat yet. like you pointed out the top of the segment, trying to figure out how to use that platform to
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help my community and get some of the things we know we want done quickly here in washington. >> tell me the platform you hope to build in all of these. i know washington could be an adjustment with everybody moving in there with the administration. it could be tough and fun and everything at once. you written a memoir and even in your tweet responding to ronna mcdaniel there, you want to make sure those who need protection and deserve equal rights are heard and seen. what are your hopes and goals? >> yeah, you know when you are apart of first coming to washington with pete, i want to make sure we use this time well and use this platform to help my community.
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our communities is consistently under attack. when i saw the chairwoman's tweet i had to say something. i know many lbgtq people who considered themselves as religious. we'll tolerate the people who deny you housing and civil rights. in their platform, they're still calling the denial of marriage. >> hey chasten, let me reassure you that you will never get use of the hate or cicadas. do you sense a formalize role on issues like this using the
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platform that you have now. and speaking of pete buttigieg, how much of a responsibility does he have to weigh in on issues like this? >> well, you know i think in this relationship i rather have pete focus on the bridges and the pipelines. i never consider myself a political person but now that we are here and i found myself with this platform, i don't think i can sit quietly and watch our community consistently being attacked by people like the chairwoman. i think pete is a very busy person. he's got a lot on his plate and if i can do a few things especially to help my community then i will. i don't want to waste the opportunity. >> chasten buttigieg, thank you
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so much. the book is out. i wish you the best of luck. >> jonathan lemire, you are going to be out of the country because you don't want to see the houston astros. i understand that you will be nervous. i will keep you updated and texts. you are going with the president of the united states over to europe and the question that most of the world has on their minds is will vladimir putin allow you to ask another questions after your helsinki inquire. >> thank you in advance for the updates that fuels my panic about the red sox playing. the president is leaving early wednesday morning and it is three stops and onto brussels
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and meeting with nato and finishing things in geneva with the summit with president putin. the agenda is ambitious. america is back sort of reassure this time around european allies. the united states is an active and trust worthy dependable partner again after four years of trump administration. i was in brussels when then president trump threatened to walk out of nato, our military alliance built after world war ii. he didn't quite do that. he left instability there and those relationships. there are still some nerves there among european capitol as to what could follow if biden is not a one-term president or return to trump.
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of course, they'll meet with them before he'll sit down with putin and he'll talk about issues like human rights and election matters. >> he gave a recommitment on article v which is something that is clearly stated. something that's stated clearly as past presidents have over four or five years. we'll be following that, jonathan, with you. kasie, set up the week for us, what are we expecting for us, are we moving any deals at all between republicans and democrats or police reform? >> infrastructure is not dead yet. police reform is another they think to watch. they're really running out of time on that. if we get to the end of the month here and we don't see any
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progress. we are expecting a major report on what happens on january 6th to come out the - this means we don't need a joint commission, it is important for everyone to remember that this report does not examine the root causes of why this happened and how. it is going to address some of the other security issues at the capitol itself. >> and mika as we began a new week, we are grateful for the capitol hill police officers who do everything they can everyday to defend the epicenter, not only american democracy but democracy across the globe. we tip our hats to them. >> yeah, i think we need to look into the why and go back in time
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and really look at how we got to this point. it is not going to be easy. but it must be done. that does it for us. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. hi there, i am stephanie ruhle, it is monday, june 7th, let's get smarter. 3,000 miles to the south where vice president kamala harris is getting ready to take her first step onto the world stage meeting with the president of guatemala as they try to get a handle on the massive surge of migration in the u.s. a job she was tapped for more than two months ago. the president is set to hold new talks with infrastructure with republican

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